Cake Decorating Community - Cakes We Bake

So... I'm thinking about buying one of those Cricut Cakes.  I saw them at Michael's for $399.00!!! However,I think my husband would kill me if I spent that much! =) But I wanted to know, does anyone have one? And if so, is it really worth the money? I mean, does it really do like it is advertised??? I think if it does what it is supposed to, you can really create some BEAUTIFUL cakes, but I'm a bit nervous spending that kind of money! Would love to see what you all think, since many of you have been in the "cake decorating world" for a long time and am sure have some great suggestions!

 

Thanks!

~Diana~

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I think the Cricut is cool, and if you are going to buy one new definitely go for the cake version since it's 100% food safe. That being said, there is a learning curve to it. You have to find out the method that works for you and your gumpaste. The thing is, that so many people ran out to buy it thinking it would instantly make them pros. You can slap lipstick on a pig, but it's still a pig if you know what I mean. If your cake is not well put together underneath... no amount of gumpaste cutouts will help it.

I think the Cricut Cake is a great tool and I will buy one from some sap who thought it was the key to instantly making their cakes perfect only to get frustrated... LOL. You do need the cartridges for the cricut to work or buy the Sure Cuts A Lot or Make The Cut software, but you will have to learn how to make the files to work with those programs. Not hard... just not an instant thing.

If you want to have different fonts, you can make templates by printing things out on card stock and cutting them out, or place the print out under a piece of waxed paper and go over it with royal icing. I make templates all the time since I don't own a Cricut.
The cricut cake is really no more or less food safe than the original. The machine as a whole is not FDA approved but individual aspects of it are, such as the stainless steel blade which, by the way, is the same stainless steel used in all their machines. They are using exactly the same motor and the only major changes are the same ones Linda tells you how to modify, with the exception of having raised the bar a bit as Linda suggested they do.

Linda primarily uses the small cricut which is much more affordable.

Jeanne said:
I think the Cricut is cool, and if you are going to buy one new definitely go for the cake version since it's 100% food safe. That being said, there is a learning curve to it. You have to find out the method that works for you and your gumpaste. The thing is, that so many people ran out to buy it thinking it would instantly make them pros. You can slap lipstick on a pig, but it's still a pig if you know what I mean. If your cake is not well put together underneath... no amount of gumpaste cutouts will help it.

I think the Cricut Cake is a great tool and I will buy one from some sap who thought it was the key to instantly making their cakes perfect only to get frustrated... LOL. You do need the cartridges for the cricut to work or buy the Sure Cuts A Lot or Make The Cut software, but you will have to learn how to make the files to work with those programs. Not hard... just not an instant thing.

If you want to have different fonts, you can make templates by printing things out on card stock and cutting them out, or place the print out under a piece of waxed paper and go over it with royal icing. I make templates all the time since I don't own a Cricut.
For me personally, if you are going to use something for food prep it should be food safe. The inside of the machine is closed in and the lubricants used on the inside during production are also food safe. That is important, especially if you are a shop (I am not, but just for the sake of saying it). The blade housing is also different and makes cutting gumpaste easier from what I have been told by people who have used both, and you cannot put the cake blade housing into the paper version.

Do I think the regular Cricut will kill people? No, but it would be important for me to get the cake version, especially if you can get a gently used one for the same price of the paper version (or less).



Kyla Myers said:
The cricut cake is really no more or less food safe than the original. The machine as a whole is not FDA approved but individual aspects of it are, such as the stainless steel blade which, by the way, is the same stainless steel used in all their machines. They are using exactly the same motor and the only major changes are the same ones Linda tells you how to modify, with the exception of having raised the bar a bit as Linda suggested they do.

Linda primarily uses the small cricut which is much more affordable.

Jeanne said:
I think the Cricut is cool, and if you are going to buy one new definitely go for the cake version since it's 100% food safe. That being said, there is a learning curve to it. You have to find out the method that works for you and your gumpaste. The thing is, that so many people ran out to buy it thinking it would instantly make them pros. You can slap lipstick on a pig, but it's still a pig if you know what I mean. If your cake is not well put together underneath... no amount of gumpaste cutouts will help it.

I think the Cricut Cake is a great tool and I will buy one from some sap who thought it was the key to instantly making their cakes perfect only to get frustrated... LOL. You do need the cartridges for the cricut to work or buy the Sure Cuts A Lot or Make The Cut software, but you will have to learn how to make the files to work with those programs. Not hard... just not an instant thing.

If you want to have different fonts, you can make templates by printing things out on card stock and cutting them out, or place the print out under a piece of waxed paper and go over it with royal icing. I make templates all the time since I don't own a Cricut.
There are also youtube videos of how to convert a paper cricut (specifically the Expression) into a Cake by making a few adjustments and some cleaning of course. Not sure if I would do that with a used machine?! But you can buy a new expressions cheaper than a cake - at least for now, but then again, as mentioned it seems the housing is different, plus you'll need the cake mats etc...so I guess the pros and cons should be weighed.
Hello
I'm new here , but a long time lurker. I got a Cake Cricut for Mothers day from one of my daughters in law ( my Favorite now LOL) . So far I have enjoyed it and once you get usesd to it , it can be a time saver.
Right... I would never use a used paper Cricut for cakes... or use it for both cake and paper. Yuck!



Jenifer said:
There are also youtube videos of how to convert a paper cricut (specifically the Expression) into a Cake by making a few adjustments and some cleaning of course. Not sure if I would do that with a used machine?! But you can buy a new expressions cheaper than a cake - at least for now, but then again, as mentioned it seems the housing is different, plus you'll need the cake mats etc...so I guess the pros and cons should be weighed.
Well, you all have cerainly answered my question!!! And I thank you for that. It's always so great to get everyone's "input". Looks like I will be purchasing a Cricut Cake very soon. I had thought about buying the one for scrapbooking (paper), but personally, it just didn't seem right/safe to me. I may just have to do some heaving web-surfing and try to find the best deal possible. I think, so far, Walmart online had the best price! The hubby is just going to have to "deal"! LOL! :0) (I don't complain about his silly World Of Warcraft computer junk as bad as I used to! LOL)

Thanks Ladies! U guys are awesome!
I had my order all placed way before the cake came out then at the last minute cancelled it and spent the $$$ on gumpaste flower tools instead. I am more intrigued by the intricate flowers than the designs that you can simply cut and stick on the side of a cake... but that is my own preferance. I think the cakes made with the cricut are amazing and love the damask looks etc but for my use... I decided the $$$ invested in my flower making supplies was a better investment. That might not be true for everyone though.

As for the food safe version vs not food safe... if you are being inspected it might be good to have the cake version. I do not know how it would go...probably depends on the inspector & state you live in. The cake version does have the protection where the sugar paste can not get into the housing and the motor so that is a good thing...

As for expense of using a cricut... do not think the one cartridge will give you the whole shabang.... I have the expression that I use for scrapbooking and cards and let me tell you the cartridges are expensive. You can get them on sale and cricut.com runs specials all the time so the most I usually pay for a cartridge is $39.99 but the cost of them is expensive.

All being said... Michael's ran a special a couple weeks ago offering the cake for $100 off. So sign up for newsletters from Michale's, JoAnn's etc and I am sure that the prices will come down... but I like Jeanne's thinking there will be a flooded market real soon of those gently used machines at a steal. There will be a lot of people thinking that purchasing this machine will make them buco bucks in the cake world only to realize that there is alot more to putting together a cake than sticking fondant cutouts on the outside of it. The structure of the cake itself is where it all begins. Hmmmm wonder if they will come up with a machine to do that... !!! :-)

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